Thursday, August 19, 2010

A great approach to managing farm stock (Via Ted.com Michael Pollan)

Growing up in a farming environment was a very interesting experience for me.  We had the traditional type farm where the cows and horses were pastured together, all the pigs in a pen and the chickens had their own house with an open air enclosed area for rummaging around outside.  In the last 15 years I have been reading about the idea of permaculture or symbiotic farming, looking back I would have loved it if my parents implemented this practice.  The whole idea of rotating livestock based on utilizing each species for its strengths in an effort to improve the health of the soil is certainly a fantastic technique.  I know if I were to go back to the farming lifestyle this is the approach I would use in managing my livestock and pasturelands.  Please take a few minutes to watch a talk that Michael Pollan does for Ted.com regarding this topic.





It is very interesting to hear Mr. Pollan talk about how the rotation of the livestock helps to manage more than fertile soils but also pest control. I would love to see more farmers using this style of livestock rotation as it increases the nutritional value of the foods produced with fewer chemical additives. We are very lucky to have this type of farming that is local and available for purchase by the general consumer.   I notice that you do pay a bit more for product at the market yet you know you are certainly getting your moneys worth with all the added nutrients these food items contain.

2 comments:

Trainer T.s Fitness said...

Wow what an amazing blog, I would never have thought about it that way.

My family grew watermelon and cantalope, had chickens and pigs how funny now I look back :-)

J J said...

Trainer T.. I was wow'd when I first started reading about poly farming a few years ago. When the plants feed on soil that has a full range of nutrients the plants have a higher ratio of nutrients for the livestock. Of course that then makes the livestock healthier for grazing on the grasses.. win win win..